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JSHR is a multidisciplinary journal that features investigations, studies, and reviews on current topics in sports, physical activity, health and education.

EFFECT OF EXERCISE ON CANCER-RELATED FATIGUE IN WOMEN: META-ANALYSIS OF RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIALS

 

ABSTRACT

 

Background: recent clinical trials show contradictory results regarding the effects of physical exercise on cancer-related fatigue in women with breast cancer. A meta-analysis was performed in order to determine whether exercise reduces this symptom or not. Methods: the search was conducted on PEDro, Cochrane Library, PROQUEST Academic Research Library, Sport Discus, Pubmed and Academic Search Complete electronic databases, as well through cross-referencing and hand searching. Methodological quality was evaluated using the PEDro scale. g effect sizes (ES) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was estimated using Q and I2. Risk of bias was screened with Egger’s test. An alpha value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: of the 583 records reviewed, 15 studies were included for analysis with a total of 1358 participants (633 in control group, 725 in experimental group) and 32 ES. In the experimental group it was found an ES of -0.269 (CI 95% -0.58 to 0.04, p = 0.08) with high heterogeneity (Q = 106.31, p < 0.001; I2 = 85.89%). ES distribution was asymmetrical (ß0, -5.50, CI 95% -8.79 a -2.23, t = 3.57, p = 0.001). Conclusions: exercise does not reduce fatigue in women with breast cancer. There is a need for large randomized controlled trials with more homogeneous fatigue assessment instruments and exercise protocols.

 

KEY WORDS

breast cancer, women, exercise, cancer-related fatigue, meta-analysis.

 

 
Journal of Sport and Health Research - 2009