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Plaza-Carmona, M.; Ubago-Guisado, E; Sánchez-Sánchez J.; Felipe, J.L.; Fernández-Luna, A.;  García-Unanue, J.; Burillo, P.; Gallardo, L. (2013). Body composition and physical fitness in prepubertal girls swimmers and soccer players. Journal of Sport and Health Research. 5(3):251-258.

 

ABSTRACT

The first objective of this study was to describe body composition (bone mass, muscle mass and fat mass) of girls who practice sports performed on different surfaces (swimming and football). The second objective was to compare the fitness between footballers and swimmers.

Methods: The sample was 33 girls, aged between 8 and 10 years. All participants were divided into three groups: girls who swim, girls who play soccer in artificial turf and sedentary girls. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to determine body composition. We used Tanner test for assess the degree of sexual development and Course Navette test to calculate the estimated maximum consumption  of oxygen. 

Results: The girls who play soccer in prepubertal ages obtained higher values in bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD). We found higher values in total BMC in girls who swim and play football compared to control girls (swimming 1010.20 ± 17.20 g; football 1074.89 ± 20.14 g y control group 959.17 ± 25.16 g). Finally, the group of girls who play football had significant differences in maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) with better results than the groups of girls who swim and control girls (swimming 49.94 ± 1.03 ml . kg . minÅ; football 55.35 ± 1.01 ml . kg . minÅ y control 46.17 ± 1.09 ml . kg . minÅ).

Conclusions: Girls who play sports have better bone mass, lean mass and less fat mass than control girls. On the other hand, girls who play soccer have a higher aerobic capacity.

 

KEY WORDS

 

bone mineral density, bone mineral content, physical activity, DXA.

 

 
Journal of Sport and Health Research - 2009